“A Doctor A Day” William Porter, MD of Charlotte, NC . . . and An Apology

Hello Warriors;

Here is your “Doctor a Day.” You know what to do. Call, email, question. Always question.

William Porter, MD of Novant Health Urogynecology, Charlotte, NC is actively recruiting for the FDA’s 522 prospective cohort study: Restorelle® Mesh Versus Native Tissue Repair for Prolapse

William Porter, MD of Novant Health Urogynecology in Charlotte, NC

William Porter, MD of Novant Health Urogynecology in Charlotte, NC

Novant Health Urogynecology

Charlotte, North Carolina, United States, 28210

Contact: Christine Mackey    704-574-5157

Principal Investigator: William Porter, MD


An Apology . . . .

As I was thinking this weekend, I realized that in sharing each doctor who is actively recruiting for this study that would implant NEW patients with Coloplast’s Restorelle for the repair of POP, I have been remiss in my “Doctor A Day” postings. I have not been doing what is core to my cause. I vowed to provide you with information, but I also promised to PROVIDE YOU WITH HOPE.

In these posts, I have not provided HOPE. For this failure, I ask, “Will you forgive me?”

hope changes everythingI hope you will. This blog is about providing you with helpful information, but it’s also about providing hope, for if we lose hope, then we have surely lost everything.

Science should be a celebration of human endeavor, the indomitable human spirit, and the ability of science, when used for GOOD, to overcome the barriers and burdens of Mother Nature that lead to human suffering and pain.

So, how does our mesh-injured community celebrate science when everywhere we turn, we seem to find another doctor who has minimized our suffering; another researcher with a clear conflict of interest; another underhanded tactic used by a lawyer; another failure of the FDA to protect us; and yet another layer of the onion, peeled back to reveal something even more horrendous?

We celebrate the true scientists among us. They are still out there.

As I’ve been sharing “A Doctor A Day,” a question occurred to me:

“What does it mean to be a ‘TRUE SCIENTIST,’ and when did the twin disciples of science and medicine begin to drift apart in such seemingly different directions?”

I immediately recalled the answer of a new friend, whom I met just recently. A chemist himself, I was truly curious and so asked him, “So, what is the difference between a true chemist and someone who uses chemistry?” I found his answer to be simple yet profound.

“A true chemist does chemistry for the sake of doing chemistry,” he said.

My friend’s answer provoked in me another question that I did not explore at the time.

“Where are our generation’s heroes of science, those men and women who, in their various hyper-intellectual specialities, are currently making history by ‘doing science for the sake of doing science?'”

And why do we now refer to scientists as “researchers?” I don’t think I like that term. At least for me, the word “researcher” carries with it a connotation that an appropriately educated person works for someone or something other than the cause of science itself, maybe even for a company who seeks to pay any given researcher to find the answer that company wants, not the answer that is scientifically valid. That is not “science for the sake of science.” That is “science for the sake of profit.”

Clearly, everyone must earn a living, but somehow the scientists of history did make a living, many times before they were employed at all. They were scientists because they wanted to be.

Maybe scientists became researchers with the advent of today’s modern Corporation, an entity whose highest value is profit.

The Corporation (Click link to view the informative documentary.)Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 3.55.54 PM

In contrast to “researcher,” the term “scientist” conveys a sense of the noble pursuit of truth, as revealed by science. For me, this word offers more meaning. The imagery I get is one of anticipation, hope and a fidelity to the purity of the scientific method.

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, and science communicator. In 2015 for his "extraordinary role in exciting the public about the wonders of science."

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, and science communicator. In 2015 for his “extraordinary role in exciting the public about the wonders of science.”

I’m thinking we need to borrow from Justin Timberlake’s lyrics here and “bring sexy back” to science and scientists.

Why should our society revere doctors as if they were gods, and not think about from where their earthly powers come, the steady long-suffering pursuit of scientific knowledge by SCIENTISTS?

The lucrative “practice of medicine,” is rooted in the dreams of scientists, the discoverers, the curious among us, those with a deep-seated need to find and find out, those with a “keen sensing search,” as Nikola Tesla has been quoted to say. By this method, we uncover the highest calling to the scientist.

Sir Alexander Fleming in his lab at London University

Sir Alexander Fleming in his lab at London University

History-making scientists of the past brought us life-saving discoveries. Many of you may know the story of Sir Alexander Fleming, who in 1928, discovered the enzyme lysozyme and the antibiotic substance penicillin from the fungus Penicillium notatum. Sir Fleming is quoted as saying,

“One sometimes finds what one is looking for.”

I love that quote. It acknowledges that Sir Fleming had the fortitude of character to know his endeavors might not reveal what he’d hoped, but, alas, that is the nature of science. Science reveals truth – not convenient truth, not truth meant for manipulation, not truth meant be to harm those whom it may benefit. Sir Fleming worked at London University.


Below are two living scientists, studying polypropylene and its effects on humans. They are to be celebrated! With many hundreds of articles published as first author, these men have C.V.s that echo what my chemist-friend said.

These men “do science for the sake of doing science.”

Thank you for chasing protons, mixing potions, and failing to find a convenient truth, but succeeding to find a scientific truth in service of humanity. 

Claudio Birolini MD, PhD, Abdominal Wall and Hernia Repair at the University of São Paulo, School of Medicine

Claudio Birolini
MD, PhD, Abdominal Wall and Hernia Repair at the University of São Paulo, School of Medicine

Dr. Claudio Birolini works for the University of São Paulo, School of Medicine.

Mesh Squamous Cell Carcinoma:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23604537

Authors: Birolini Claudio, Minossi JG, Lima CF, Utiyama EM, Rasslan S.


Dr. Vladimir Iakovlev St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto Implantology, Oncology, Pathology

Dr. Vladimir Iakovlev
St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto
Implantology, Oncology, Pathology

Dr. Vladimir V. Iakovlev works for St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto.

Long-term effects from the degradation of polypropylene in vivo: 

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jbm.b.33502/abstract

Authors: Vladimir V. Iakovlev, Scott A. Guelcher, and Robert Bendavid

2 responses

  1. You are so welcome. I am trying to open a dialog with the FDA about this study, but in the meantime, I’d at least like to try and reach the women who live in the areas where doctors are recruiting and educate them that there are very serious risks that they should research. I also want women to know that these doctors have an incentive to recruit them into the study. I would hate to think any doctor would be intimidating in this regard, but unfortunately, I’ve seen doctors intimidate women during appointments. 😦

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