NCHR’s Patient Advocacy Workshop: What I Learned

Hello Warriors;

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A snapshot I took of a beautiful vigil held at the Rochambeau Statue in Lafayette Square in D.C. after the Paris attacks.

This past week/weekend, amidst the worldwide panic and sorrow over the terrorist attacks in Paris, I attended the National Center for Health Research’s second Patient Advocacy Workshop in Washington, D.C. It was strange to be there under such uncertain circumstances. I couldn’t help but worry about if one of our nation’s capitol cities, even D.C., could be next. Thankfully, that was not the case, and all of us returned to our homes safely, despite concerns at the three D.C. airports: Several People Removed from Spirit Airlines on flight departing BWI.

 

 

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Fellow Patient Advocates at the NCHR Workshop

I felt at home, as I was surrounded by 30 or so patient advocates; individuals just like me, who advocate for a loved one, or by their own injuries, effort daily to raise the public’s awareness about the breadth and depth of medical harm. Many of these folks touched my heart. Like all of us, they each struggle to comprehend how so much harm has befallen so many and has come from the very institutions meant to promote good health and protect and preserve health as stakeholders in the health of our nation.

 

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If you are mesh injured, and you don’t think this post is for you, keep reading.

Patients and advocates came from all corners of the nation for this conference: Hawaii, Pennsylvania, California to Tennessee; and everywhere in between, including Texas! Each attendee was invited for differing healthcare concerns, but we were all there for the same purpose: To unite as advocates who are committed to bringing real-world patient voices to industry and government.

After breakfast Friday morning, we began with a test to gauge our current knowledge base and understanding of the FDA and its regulatory practices. We took a follow-up test at the end of the program to gauge what we learned from our training sessions. I don’t have my results yet, but I promise to share them once I do!

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Diana Zuckerman, Ph.D. and President of the National Center for Health Research AND the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund

Our training began in earnest as we learned the ins-and-outs of the FDA and its regulatory policies from our host and the founder of the National Center for Health Research and the Cancer Prevention and Treatment Fund, Diana Zuckerman, Ph.D. Dr. Zuckerman has a lengthy career as a scientist and researcher, as a faculty member at Vassar and Yale, and as a researcher at Harvard. Her work on Capitol Hill has ranged from Congressional staffer to AAAS Congressional Science Fellow and former senior policy advisor to First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. She has spoken dozens of times before Congress, federal agencies, state legislative committees, and even the Canadian Parliament! Formally trained in epidemiology and public health at the Yale College of Medicine, her work at NCHR now focuses on creating a stronger FDA. She serves on the federal Medicare Coverage Advisory Committee and on the board of directors at The Reagan-Udall Foundation and the Alliance for a Stronger FDA.

We then took time to introduce ourselves, our areas of interest, and what we hoped to gain from our attendance and training. Those moments were some of my favorites. That time gave me hope, because there are so many individuals who have made great strides in their advocacy. It reminded me that the possibilities for our mesh-injured community are endless. It renewed my hope in our shared cause. As is most often the case, it is the individual human being who has the capacity to make the most significant changes for good. I am reminded of the famed quote by author, seeker, academic, anthropologist and all-around troublemaker, Margaret Mead, who said,

“Never believe that a few caring people can’t change the world, for indeed, that’s all who ever have.”

I met more than a few caring people at the workshop.

I met a man who suffers from Ataxia; a congenital, degenerative neurological disorder that progressively affects coordination, speech, and swallowing. It must have required enormous effort each time he spoke, but I am forever changed by the confidence with which he uttered each word. Unafraid to ask for help, as he should be, he introduced himself and offered, “If you don’t understand what I say; ask me to repeat it.” What a powerful message, one from which we all can learn. Find out more about Ataxia from The National Ataxia Foundation, established in 1957, and dedicated to improving the lives of persons with Ataxia through support, education and research.

I met parents who have lost their young adult daughters to the often downplayed, lethal risks associated with hormone-based contraceptives. These parents have taken action; not because someone told them to, but because they want to honor their daughters’ legacies and raise awareness, with the hope that they will prevent others from experiencing the devastation of losing a child. Their heartbreak was so palpable that it was like another advocate in the room. Many people, from all walks of life, say that there is nothing in life so painful as the loss of one’s child.

Richard and Dianne Ammons honor the life and loss of their daughter, Annie, to YAZ, a drospirenone, hormonal contraceptive. They raise awareness through their Letters To Annie website. Other advocates Joe (www.birthcontrolsafety.org) and Dru (www.birthcontrolwisdom.com) honor their daughters’ legacies and raise awareness about deadly blood clots associated with the Nuva Ring hormonal contraceptive device.

I met a charter member of Washington Advocates for Patient Safety, who though injured by a metal-on-metal hip implant herself, still advocates for others, even as she continues to suffer daily. In fact, The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services,  just yesterday, announced their Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model (CJR), saying,

Hip and knee replacements are the most common inpatient surgery for Medicare beneficiaries and can require lengthy recovery and rehabilitation periods. In 2014, there were more than 400,000 procedures, costing more than $7 billion for the hospitalizations alone.”

I met a man, now disabled for life, who was implanted with a spinal medical device used off-label by his surgeon. With access to the best care in the world and a powerful family to boot, not even he could escape the long arm of medical harm. His story speaks to how overwhelming the issue of medical device harm has become. It does not discriminate. 

I met a U.S. veteran from Austin, TX who was exposed to Agent Orange during his service to our country and has suffered and survived prostate cancer as a result. He now facilitates a Prostate Cancer Support Group, a group that I imagine my husband’s grandfather, a fighter pilot in the Vietnam and Korean Wars, would have benefited from greatly. 

I met mothers whose children suffer from rare diseases, and for which it is so difficult to raise awareness (not so different from mesh injury in that regard). I met many women who suffer from rare heart disease, yet are stigmatized. We agreed that no one deserves to be judged by any health condition, especially the number one killer in the U.S. for both men and women: heart disease.

I met a woman from Essure Problems who was involved with the recent FDA public hearing addressing Bayer HealthCare’s Essure System for permanent female sterilization and the adverse reactions associated with the permanent contraceptive device. Somewhat shy and reserved, it was hard to imagine that she recently spoke to the FDA. I point out this fact, because it is proof-positive that anyone can be an agent of change. All that is necessary to become an influential patient advocate is that you care deeply about others, and that you’re willing to push through any fear that could hold you back or keep you silent.

IMG_1167Two representatives from the FDA gave a brief presentation to explain how patient advocates can become involved in patient-centered policy at the FDA.

We also heard from PCORI, the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute  and how, in just three short years, the newly-formed organization has funded many research projects with the aim of measuring outcomes which relate to the patient’s perspective and well being. We learned that, far too often, research in healthcare is designed to test and measure factors that may impact the patient, but may not always be designed to assess the benefit of any given outcome to the quality or quantity of patients’ lives.

Susan Molchan, MD, a decorated physician and scientist provided an eye-opening perspective. Having worked in private practice, as a staff psychiatrist for the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and as a medical officer at the FDA, she is a walking library of experiences! She has returned to clinical work and writing in her areas of interest: healthy aging, health literacy, and conflicts of interest in medicine. She now serves as attending psychiatrist at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C. She spoke to us in her capacity as a member of the board of directors for the National Physician’s Alliance, an organization which champions “The Unbranded Doctor,” and the core values of the medical profession that many would say have been lost: Service, Integrity, and Advocacy. I’m glad to know the NPA exists, for surely there are many physicians who care deeply about the core values of their chosen profession and realize that so much trust between patients and physicians has been broken. It’s a great resource for us, as patients and advocates, too.

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Desirée Walker, two time Breast Cancer Victor

We heard inspiring talks by longtime patient advocates like Desirée Walker, who having survived breast cancer twice, refers to herself as a “Cancer Victor.” Desirée works with the U.S. DOD-funded breast cancer research program and has made such an impact for good towards the search for a cure.

 

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Tim Horn, 20+ year survivor of HIV and HIV/AIDS patient advocate

Tim Horn, HIV Project Director at the Treatment Action Group, reminded us that the long journies of HIV/AIDS patients and advocates, who came before us, can serve as an example for all of us. Though the road is long, significant change can be brought about by our long-term commitment and the continued courage to speak out, even through setbacks and progress that seems to come far too slowly for those who are suffering and dying.

The lives of these patients and advocates and the stories they tell are just like ours.

We are most certainly not alone in our fight against the epidemic of preventable medical harm and the diseases, common to all, which require the FDA to get involved in service of America’s public health. We even share the hurt that all patients suffer under the guidance of a public health system that can be much too bureaucratic to mobilize in the face of infectious disease. We’re experiencing that very problem now, as the irresponsible use and administration of antibiotics continues to hasten antibiotic resistance.

In sharing these insights, my hope is that no person in our community would feel abandoned or alone. We can connect to others through our shared suffering, but once connected, we can live our lives alongside one another to create a “new normal” which can draw us out of the isolation and loneliness of chronic illness. Suffering is suffering. We all experience the common feelings of anger, loss, regret, sorrow. . . and hope. As Desirée says,

“He who has health has hope. And he who has hope has everything.”

Though many of us have lost a great deal of our health, and we grieve that loss; we can also choose hope, for we still have health.

Thank you to the staff members at NCHR and PCORI for allowing us to learn from one another and together, as individuals working in concert, help us to gather our voices so that each of us may be heard louder still.

And for those of you who actually read this far, here’s a funny for you. If it’s one thing I think we all agree on, it’s that humor is often the best medicine, and sometimes the only medicine for our broken bodies and hearts.

~ For my mother, whom I love with audacious action. ~

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2 responses

  1. This is an excellent summary of the workshop at the National Center for Health Research. I had the privilege of attending this workshop too. It was a very positive experience to be with this special group of people who have decided to take their personal medical harm experience and turn that energy into working to change our broken system so that no one has to suffer from preventable medical harm again. There is no doubt that we must work together to bring about the needed changes; this workshop was definitely an effort to start a movement, by bringing our individual voices into a group for that purpose. Many thanks to the National Center for Health Research, to everyone who participated in this workshop, and to “The Mesh Warrior” for this blog.
    Rex Johnson
    Washington Advocates for Patient Safety

    Liked by 1 person

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