MESH INJURY – “Spotlight Symptoms”

Hello Warriors;

Today, I’m starting a blog series called, “MESH INJURY – Spotlight Symptoms.”*

TVMI encounter an alarmingly typical and recurrent problem when advocating for and with mesh-injured patients. It goes something like this:

  1. Mesh-injured patient develops a disturbing symptom.
  2. Mesh-injured patient visits his/her PCP or a specialist to seek diagnosis and treatment.
  3. Physician performs a physical exam, and says something like, “I don’t know what that is,” or I’ve never seen anything like this [symptom].”
  4. Patient is confused and bewildered and asks if there are tests that could be done or another doctor or specialist who would know more about the symptom.
  5. Physician says, “No,” and doesn’t perform any diagnostics to find out the underlying cause of the symptom (environmental cause, disease process, injury, or infectious pathogen).
  6. Physician prescribes medicine to mask or alleviate symptom(s) (e.g. topical creams for rashes, antibiotics for a suspected infection, maybe some other pharmaceutical to control pain or discomfort, or even an invasive or non-invasive form of treatment).
  7. Patient goes home still symptomatic, with no diagnosis, and with one or more pharmaceutical or other treatments to consider, which may or may not work, since the UNDERLYING CAUSE or UNDERLYING PATHOLOGY, which caused the symptom to manifest, was never studied in depth by the treating physician.
  8. Patient goes home and follows pharmaceutical regimen or advice for treatment.
  9. Pharmaceuticals and treatments do not alleviate symptom(s). Symptom(s) continue.
  10. Patient is left untreated and without a next step.

Paternalistic-vs-Patient-CenteredOftentimes a physician will refer to a symptom as “idiopathic,” which in layman’s terms simply means, “Who knows where it came from?” There is a responsible use of this term, but I see it used irresponsibly too often.

Some diseases are generally agreed to be “of idiopathic origin,” because no one in science can definitively identify an underlying cause. In this case, “idiopathic” is often part of the name of the disease or syndrome itself. Some examples are:

  • Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (sometimes called Acute or Chronic ITP) is a bleeding disorder, in which a patient has abnormally low blood platelets, and thus their blood does not properly clot.
  • Idiopathic Hemochromatosis – is another bleeding disorder, in which an abnormal and dangerous amount of iron accumulates in the body’s tissues or organs, including the liver and lungs.

Both disorders are life threatening if left untreated. These disorders present with SYMPTOMS, and when doctors invest in diagnostic procedures, these diagnostic procedures, coupled with symptoms, lead them to a diagnosis, which then leads to a treatment or even a cure.

A serious problem arises when physicians use the word “idiopathic” irresponsibly. In all cases, any particular symptom or cluster of symptoms do originate from some cause, from something, from somewhere, and any doctor who does not search for the underlying cause of a symptom is negligent. “I don’t know,” would be a more accurate physician response in this situation, however; “idiopathic” sounds so much more, you know, medical and stuff. Odd or uncommon symptoms can often co-occur, simultaneously with other more salient symptoms, and when viewed together as a whole, the underlying disease process in these cases, can be more obvious, leading to a higher chance of diagnosis, or a more rapid diagnosis, which then leads to the correct treatment, to the best of the physician’s actual knowledge.

Puzzled male shrugging wearing lab coat

But, what if a patient presents with an idiopathic symptom that does not have a common accompanying symptom or cluster of symptoms that is easily recognizable to an average physician? In my personal experience, this situation is when physicians can get a bit lazy with the use of  the term”idiopathic.”

“Of idiopathic origin” is so much more dignified on a patient’s chart than:

“I have no friggin’ idea, but it’s not my problem, so I gave the patient some samples.”

So, has your physician ever told you, “I’ve never seen that symptom,” or “Your symptom seems to be idiopathic and will most likely resolve on its own.”?

If so, I’d love to hear from you.

Have you had the experience I describe above?device-transvaginal-mesh-edit

If you have, what was the symptom?

Did you ever get to the bottom of it?

Did the physician suggest diagnostic testing, or did you ask for such if he/she did not?

Did you find your doctors to be helpful in assisting you as you continued to pursue a cause, or did you find that your doctor quietly excused himself from your care, and left you to find some other doctor who might help?

Tuesday we’ll talk about the first of many symptoms which are commonly seen in mesh-injured patients, but for which doctors often say there is no explanation or that physician seems to have no drive to find an explanation.

With this series of blogs, I hope to highlight some very common symptoms, for which mesh-injured patients are turned away, left with no medical solution to pursue. Let’s use our collective knowledge as a community to help one another and to help those who don’t understand the realities of ongoing mesh injury.

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*I am not a doctor. This information is for education purposes only and is based on my personal experiences. If you have a symptom, please find a doctor who will help you identify and treat your symptoms.

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